ISSL Reflections April 17 2022 Matthew 28:1–10 Post 2

IV.“Then go quickly and tell his disciples …” Why are the two women asked to “tell his disciples”? V.Matthew 28:1-10 (New Revised Standard Version) After the sabbath, as the first day of the week was dawning, Mary Magdalene and the … Continue reading

ISSL Reflections April 10 2022 Matthew 26:17–30 Post 3

VII.Today, let’s return to this passage from Matthew and after reading it once again, turn attention to the second paragraph and take notice of the remarks about betrayal. VIII.Matthew 26:17-30 (New Revised Standard Version) On the first day of Unleavened … Continue reading

ISSL Reflections April 10 2022 Matthew 26:17–30 Post 2

IV.I’d like to pick up today something in my closing remark in the last post – “ … Jesus’ remark’s about ‘body’ and ‘blood’ and ‘forgiveness’ and sharing with them in the ‘kingdom.”” Think about what Jesus “shares” with those … Continue reading

ISSL Reflections April 3 2022 Matthew 21:1–11 Post 3

VIII.Let’s return to our reading from Matthew. Read it again while also holding in your mind the images of Pilate’s entry into Jerusalem we read in the previous post. IX.Matthew 21:1-11 (New Revised Standard Version) When they had come near … Continue reading

ISSL Reflections April 3 2022 Matthew 21:1–11 Post 2

IV.Let’s continue to think about how Jesus’ entrance into Jerusalem as described by Matthew and how others enter the city. Take time to read our focus passage again and hold onto any details that draw your attention. V.Matthew 21:1-11 (New … Continue reading

ISSL Reflections April 3 2022 Matthew 21:1–11 Post 1

I.I’ve noticed in a number of bibles this passage is labeled, “Jesus’ Triumphal Entry into Jerusalem.” Is that a fitting description? What seems to you to be “triumphal” and what seems to you to be not so “triumphal”? II.Matthew 21:1-11 … Continue reading

ISSL Reflections June 27, 2021, Matthew 14:22-33 Post 3

VIII.This week we’ve taken time to read and reread this passage several times. I trust we have not just “read over” it because it is familiar, or “read through” it since we already know what “happens” but have “read into” … Continue reading